The Story

In 1827 a pardoned convict, Thomas Pye, secured a land grant near the junction of the Campbell and Gilmandyke Rivers.

The area was named by the local aboriginals as, bunnamagoo– translated as the meeting of waters.  Thomas Pye registered the property with the same name and with the help of convict labourers, he crafted a stone Georgian-style homestead from locally quarried soapstone . The Bunnamagoo homestead was one of the first pastoral homesteads built west of the ranges and is still used today.

Over the years as the property passed from owner to owner it was subjected to a number of unsympathetic alterations. By the time Bunnamagoo was acquired by the Paspaley family in 1992 the original soapstone house had fallen badly into decay. Over the years, the rudimentary mortar that bound the random shaped stones had been leached away by the rain and harsh cold conditions of the area.   A local architect  was commissioned to restore the house and, with due regard to its historical significance, to make additions to enable the house to be used as the homestead of a working farm.

The area was named by the local aboriginals as, Bunnamagoo - meaning the meeting of waters

Modern Comfort

A sympathetic extension was added to the rear of the house affording much needed extra accommodation and to meet modern standards but still retaining the historical features of the original homestead.

The completed renovation was awarded a heritage commendation by the National Trust of Australia.

Bunnamagoo continues to be run as a grazing property and its small vineyard is producing premium  cool climate wines.  Bunnamagoo Reserve vintages are designated “1827” to commemorate the date of the  construction of the Bunnamagoo homestead.

The completed renovation was awarded a heritage commendation by the National Trust of Australia